Second Chance Act- Grants

Second Chance Act
Signed into law on April 9, 2008, the Second Chance Act (P.L. 110-199) was designed to improve outcomes for people returning to communities from prisons and jails. This first-of-its-kind legislation authorizes federal grants to government agencies and nonprofit organizations to provide employment assistance, substance abuse treatment, housing, family programming, mentoring, victims support, and other services that can help reduce recidivism.

Attorney General Holder Announces 188 New Second Chance Act Grantees
On Friday, October 8, 2010, United States Attorney General Eric Holder announced that 188 programs have been selected to receive funding in 2010 under the Second Chance Act (SCA). In making the announcement, Holder said that the Justice Department reviewed more than 975 applications for SCA funding. According to the Attorney General, “A decade ago, few programs focused on prisoner reintegration. Today, coalitions of government organizations and community groups in every corner of our country are working together to improve reentry outcomes.”

In discussing the new grantees, he said, “While most of these new investments will go to states, localities, and nonprofit organizations, we are also awarding funds to support the National Reentry Resource Center—a ‘one stop shop’ for state-of-the-art information assistance.”

The following chart breaks down the funding by for FY2010 SCA Grantees by program type:

FY2010 SCA Grant Program Application Results
FY10 Grant Program Total applications received Total grants awarded Total amount awarded
Adult Demonstration (101) 145 53 $28,073,393
Juvenile Demonstration (101) 39 13 $7,207,146
Reentry Courts (111) 9 9 $2,651,703
Family-Based Substance Abuse Treatment (113) 36 23 $6,645,611
Evaluate and Improve Education in Prisons, Jails, and Juvenile Facilities (114) 12 1 $2,463,635
Technology Career Training Demonstration (115) 44 7 $4,679,466
Substance Abuse & Criminal Justice Collaboration (201) 77 22 $11,705,855
Adult Mentoring (211) 613 50 $13,968,672
Juvenile Mentoring (211) 214 9 $5,018,909
Total 1189 188 $82,414,390

Second Chance Act Grant Tracks Funded in 2010
To see a list of the projects funded, please click on the title of the grant program.

Adult Demonstration: Funding under this section helps state and local agencies implement projects and strategies to reduce recidivism and ensure the safe and successful reentry of adults released from prisons and jails back to the community. In 2009, fifteen Adult Demonstration Grant Projects were funded. In 2010, fifty-three Adult Demonstration Grant Projects received funding. To see a list of the 2010 local government grantees, please click here. A list of the 2010 state government grantees is located here, and a list of the 2010 tribal grantees is located here.
Juvenile Demonstration Projects: Funding for these projects helps state and local agencies implement projects and strategies to reduce recidivism and ensure the safe and successful reentry of juveniles released from youth detention facilities back into the community. This grant program is administered through the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In 2009, five Juvenile Demonstration Grant Projects were funded. In 2010, thirteen Juvenile Demonstration Grant Projects received funding.
Reentry Court Projects: This section’s funding helps state and local government agencies and federally recognized Indian tribes establish state, local, and tribal reentry courts monitor offenders and provide them with the treatment services necessary to establish a self-sustaining and law-abiding life. This section did not receive funding in 2009. In 2010, nine Reentry Court Projects received funding.
Family-Based Substance Abuse Treatment Projects: Funding under this section helps state and local government agencies and federally recognized Indian tribes establish or enhance residential substance abuse treatment projects in correctional facilities that include family supportive services. This section did not receive funding in 2009. In 2010, twenty-three projects received funding.
Evaluate and Improve Education in Prison, Jails, and Juvenile Facilities: Funding under this section helps a state or local government agency or federally recognized Indian tribe, or other public or private entity to evaluate methods to improve academic and vocational education for incarcerated adults and juveniles, identify and make recommendations to the Department of Justice regarding best practices relating to academic and vocational education for incarcerated adults and juveniles, and to improve the academic and vocational education programs available to incarcerated adults and juveniles. This section did not receive funding in 2009. In 2010, one project received funding.
Technology Career Training: Funding under this section helps state and local governments and federally recognized Indian tribes to establish programs to train individuals in prisons, jails, or juvenile residential facilities for technology-based jobs and careers during the three-year period before their release.
Substance Abuse & Criminal Justice Collaboration: Funding under this section is designed to provide treatment and recovery support services to offenders during incarceration and after their return to the community; funds may be used for treating co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders in prison programs, jails, and juvenile detention facilities, providing recovery support services, reentry planning and programming, and post-release treatment and aftercare programming in the community.
Adult Mentoring Projects: Funding under this section helps nonprofit organizations and federally recognized Indian tribes implement mentoring projects to promote the safe and successful reintegration into the community of adults who have been incarcerated. In 2009, thirty-six Adult Mentoring Grant Projects were funded. In 2010, fifty Adult Mentoring Grant Projects received funding.
Juvenile Mentoring Projects: Funding under this section helps nonprofit organizations and federally recognized Indian tribes implement mentoring projects to promote the safe and successful reintegration into the community of juveniles who have been incarcerated. This grant program is administered through the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In 2009, eleven Juvenile Mentoring Grant Projects were funded. In 2010, nine Juvenile Mentoring Grant Projects received funding.
In addition to these awards, other reentry research and technical assistance Second Chance Act awards were announced.

2010 Second Chance Act Solicitations
To see the 2010 Second Chance Act Grant Solicitations, please click here.

Key Resources
Second Chance Act Demonstration Project Grants: A Checklist for States, Local Governments, and Indian Tribes, National Reentry Resource Center
Understanding the Second Chance Act: Adult and Juvenile State and Local Reentry Demonstration Projects Grants (Section 101) , National Reentry Resource Center
Understanding the Second Chance Act: Adult Mentoring Grants (Section 211), National Reentry Resource Center
Second Chance Act Funding Overview and Updates, Council of State Governments Justice Center
Text of the Second Chance Act (P.L. 110-199)
2009 Second Chance Grantees
In September 2009 the U.S. Department of Justice awarded over $28 million dollars to states, local governments and nonprofit organizations under the Second Chance Act. This initial round of Second Chance Act funding was divided across five programs: adult mentoring, adult demonstration, juvenile mentoring, juvenile demonstration, and the National Reentry Resource Center. The following chart breaks down funding by program type.

Grant Program Total Awards Granted Total Awards Funded
Adult Mentoring Grants 36 $10,000,000
Adult Demonstration Grants 15 $7,732,726
Juvenile Mentoring Grants 11 $4,707,524*
Juvenile Demonstration Grants 5 $3,660,172
National Reentry Resource Center 1 $2,200,000
Total 68 $28,300,422

* Congress appropriated $25 million for the Second Chance Act grant programs in fiscal year 2009, but the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention supplemented the available funds to provide grants for 11 juvenile mentoring programs.

To learn more about the Second Chance Act, click here.
To see the list of Adult Mentoring Grantees, click here.
To see the list of Adult Demonstration Grantees, click here.
To see the list of Juvenile Mentoring Grantees, click here.
To see the list of Juvenile Demonstration Grantees, click here.
Second Chance Act News Clips

Concord Monitor (NH) — Parole savings uncertain – Availability of services presents big challenge
11/21/10 — “Corrections officials acknowledge that waiting lists exist across the state for treatment programs used by parolees. The department’s assistant commissioner, William McGonagle, described the current system as ‘barely adequate.’ But McGonagle and Commissioner William Wrenn say that’s going to change – and soon, thanks to several federal grants awarded to state agencies and counties. Some of that grant money is already being spent. In Merrimack County, parolees considered to have a high risk of reoffending can get mental health counseling and help finding a job for free through a $400,000 grant from the Second Chance Act, a federal initiative focused on prisoner re-entry programs.”

New Haven Independent (CT) — New Federal Cash Keeps Re-Entry Effort In Business
11/17/10 — “Chanel Highsmith can tell you how one mistake almost ruined her life. She can also explain how the city’s Prison Re-Entry Program has restored her faith in herself. Now two federal grants totalling $1.25 million will allow the program that’s helped her to help others.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution (GA) — Second chance for prisoners
11/12/10 — “Fulton County has been granted approximately $749,000 from the U.S. Department of Justice as a part of the federal Second Chance Act to fund a program aimed at keeping convicts in the jail from re-offending when they get out as well as reducing the county’s costs.”

The Free Lance-Star (VA) — Ex-prisoner program funded
10/12/10 — “Under the Second Chance Act Prisoner Re-entry Initiative, the re-entry council and five others in Virginia, including Culpeper, will get $1.5 million. Councils can use the money on a variety of services, such as job training or temporary housing, literacy classes, educational programs or mental health and substance abuse programs. The King George and Culpeper councils will use the money to hire a case manager to oversee hard-to-place inmates.”

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s